Faith In India & The Women’s Role From Childhood To Death

A face of India the tourist tours would rather you didn’t see. A national tragedy.

Edge of Humanity Magazine

Photographer Arka Dutta is the Edge of Humanity Magazine contributor of this social documentary photography.  From his project ‘Eve Was Framed‘.  To see Arka’s projects  and photographs click on any image.

The teachings of total dependency on Gods are incorporated from the very early stages of childhood. But they are more prone to make someone God-fearing rather than God-loving The teachings of total dependency on Gods are incorporated from the very early stages of childhood. They are more prone to make someone God-fearing rather than God-loving

An young girl participate in the holy Ganga Sagar festival dressed up as a Goddess. She traveled 180 KM from hew village to attend this occasion and was told that this custom was more important than her annual exams which was due in 5 days time. A young girl participates in the holy Ganga Sagar festival dressed up as a Goddess. She traveled 180 KM from her village to attend this occasion and was told that this custom was more important than her annual exams which was due in 5 days time.

Hundreds of young girls from villages go missing every year. The statistics from my state West Bengal alone is alarming. In a latest of such incidents, 10 girls went missing during a religious trip. Hundreds of young girls from villages go missing every year. The statistics from my state West Bengal alone is alarming. In a latest of such incidents, 10 girls went missing during a religious trip.

In my country, India, I have seen religious notions…

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Published by

Jane Dougherty

I used to do lots of things I didn't much enjoy. Now I am officially a writer. It's what I always wanted to be.

8 thoughts on “Faith In India & The Women’s Role From Childhood To Death”

  1. This is awful! Growing up in another part of India and living a good life in the cities, we modern women were/are not even aware that such retrograde rituals exist in remote villages of the Bengal state of India. We also never ever felt Indian religions to be God-fearing; rather very calm, meditative, God-loving and non-violent.
    I am not sure if there is some exaggeration in this article or not, but the exotic visuals obviously add spice to the gory tale.

    1. It’s the same everywhere. There are places in every western city that the affluent people would never believe exist and the ordinary people would rather not know too much about. We all have skeletons in the cupboard.

      1. That’s so true! Sometimes ignorance is bliss, or else knowledge brings shame and embarrassment. But then there can be no change ever without acknowledging the dark truths. Minutes after I read your re-blogged article, I came across the following story.

        http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/postcolonial-blog/2016/apr/05/lachlan-macquarie-was-no-humanitarian-his-own-words-show-he-was-a-terrorist

        I’m not unfamiliar with Australian history but I didn’t know the above facts about Macquarie, the “most eulogised and memorialised of colonial governors, with a university, many buildings, a bank, a library and countless statues and plaques named in his honour”

        People like us read such articles but life goes on…

      2. A few weeks ago there was a violent demo in Paris against the opening of a hostel for homeless people in the poshest quartier of Paris. The demonstrators, wearing leopard skin coats and Armani suits hurled abuse at the mayor’s representatives who had come to explain why this centre was needed and why this particular quartier had to start pulling its weight. Every other Paris arrondissement had hundreds of places in shelters, and the richest arronissement of all had zero. The leopard skin coats roared that they hadn’t paid millions to have to share the view with poor people, and it was unkind to put poor people in a rich neighbourhood because they’s feel out of place etc etc.
        The journalists, I’m pleased to say, had a field day getting them to stick their hooves in their mouths and recording it for posterity. Nonetheless, it was shocking to listen to the utter selfish garbage these privileged people were coming out with. They just have no idea, no heart, no sympathy.

      3. Thanks for sharing these incidents! It is pretty much the same everywhere, for even in well developed first world countries that have plentiful resources, human rights do get violated…of course developing countries have more to cope up with esp. those with very ancient traditions, both good and bad. May sanity prevail as this world becomes a better place!

      4. I have faith that the internet revolution will make it harder for governments as well as cliques, secret societies, mafia type societies and general criminal elements to keep their crimes hushed up. I don’t have faith in politicians to do much for ethical reasons, but if it means they get to keep their job, they might just be persuaded to take the right kinds of action.

      5. That’s true Jane! Internet revolution makes it difficult for baddies to get away with anything; also makes them worry about their survival in the game.

        It was insightful discussing these issues with you. Have a nice week!

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