Microfiction Three Line Tales: A new life

For Sonya’s Three Line Tales prompt. A cat story.

tltweek70

Raymond’s old lady hadn’t stirred that morning, not even when he licked her face and meowled very loudly in her ear, and he couldn’t get into the plastic container where she kept the biscuits.

He wriggled through the cat flap and whisked his tail in indecision—wall or tree?

The wall led a long way, longer than Raymond had ever been before, but he knew where he was going, could smell it as soon as he left the confines of the garden, his new life—he had always wanted to be a ship’s cat.

Advertisements

Published by

Jane Dougherty

I used to do lots of things I didn't much enjoy. Now I am officially a writer. It's what I always wanted to be.

34 thoughts on “Microfiction Three Line Tales: A new life”

  1. So, Raymond’s old lady has passed on and it’s time to seek pastures (or oceans) new. Ah, the fickle nature of the feline! Though there is something about the seafaring life that suits a cat. Lovely, well paced tale, Jane

      1. Some do that, don’t they? Hang about a bit then bog off when a better offer comes up. You can’t rely on them, but at least they don’t need much looking after. And Raymond is a great name for a cat 🙂

      2. I thought Raymond suited him very well. I used his name for a password for something or other and there was a glitch that meant I had to telephone to ask for a new password. The woman wanted to know the old one. When I said, Raymond, there was a pause, and then she asked, Raymond? I was a bit non-plussed and said, Yes, Raymond, it’s the name of our cat. She said, You have a cat called Raymond? I thought this was getting a bit surreal. Yes, I said, why? There was another pause and she said, I have an uncle called Raymond. I must say this is in France and people have funny ideas.

      3. Haha! Love how non plussed she was -surely Raymond isn’t that odd a name? I remember ringing a woman about some flowers we were unable to deliver for her. When she asked my and I told her, she just laughed out loud and swore that swore that I was joking, that I was a prank call set up by her friends. Patiently, I had to explain that I was not a prank, that I was indeed called Lynn Love. I think she was a little embarrassed after that 🙂

      4. Did she think you were saying, it’s Lynn, love? Yorkshire folk would have assumed that 🙂 French people give their pets names that I find completely wacky (I mean, a fat Staffie called Pegasus?), but they think it’s weird to give an animal a human name.

      5. It depends on the creature, but I tend to think respectful names are best (like Raymond) rather than Joker or Cartoon or Lantern, not to mention Virus and Tonsilitis all of whom I know and sympathise with 🙂

      6. Tonsilitus? Really? That’s like calling someone Salmonella or Listeria because you think the word is pretty. I know of a mixed race boy whose mother called him Toffee – that takes some beating

      7. Her owner is a bit bizarre. Plays a mouth organ in the park for fun. Toffee! Poor kid! That sounds insulting. I doubt she’d be allowed to do that here.

      8. I know, awful, isn’t it? Positively racist really. Well, if you’re going to be eccentric, do it with a harmonica and a weirdly named pet!

      9. Yes, exactly. Be interesting to know what English sounds like to people who primarily speak other languages. Somehow, I doubt we sound as musical as say French or Italian sounds to us 🙂

      10. Don’t think I’ve ever really listened to Bulgarian, so I’ll have to take your word for that. I guess we have to sound good against something! 🙂

    1. If people can get a taste for the sea, why not cats? A circus lion though…nope. Not never. I hate seeing animals do tricks and imaging the cruelty involved in getting them ‘trained’.

    1. They’re probably right too. Dogs don’t. They’d hang around the corpse until they died too and everyone praises their loyalty (which it is, of course) but they’d still be dead or miserable. Cats move on.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s