Perfect break

This haibun is for the dverse prompt. The theme is beauty in imperfection.

ripples4

There is nothing perfect under the sun. Every rose has its beetle-nipped petal, every black cat a hair or two of white, every sunset a worry that takes the form of a small black cloud. The beach has its tidemark of plastic bags, the forest, broken branches and idiotic picnickers. Even the blackbird has lost a tail feather. No pitch is perfect to the ears of a dog; no song will bring tears to every eye.

Yet the beauty of this world is in your lop-sided grin, the way you sing off key, and that you came back one day, after years of anguish, dark skies dispersed and doubts put to rest. You came back with open hands full of sunlight and the heart I gave you that you didn’t want, and this time, to place it with your own.

 

Lake mirror shatters

into broken silver lightβ€”

trout leap, ripple arc.

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Published by

Jane Dougherty

I used to do lots of things I didn't much enjoy. Now I am officially a writer. It's what I always wanted to be.

40 thoughts on “Perfect break”

    1. Thank you πŸ™‚ I had to think about this one since I’m not sure that I agree with the notion of attainable perfection anyway, so how can you intentionally mar perfection to make it truly prefect?

      1. A garden is a very good example. A true gardener is always planting, changing things around to find where a plant thrives best, pruning back to let something else have the light, not laying it out as if a garden is bought by the yard like carpet, and once it’s fitted you can admire it in its glory for eternity πŸ™‚

  1. I admire the details of imperfections yet there is beauty in the smallest of detail like the lop-sided, and a love re-discovered and treasured ~ Love your haibun ~

    1. Thank you, Victoria. The story you told of the student shaking a few petals onto his perfect garden to make it really perfect left me non-plussed. I can’t imagine perfection, even less how a neat and regimented garden could be considered perfection, so the idea of deliberately untidying it to make it really prefect goes over my head! Give me nature warts and all πŸ™‚

    1. Thanks Walter πŸ™‚ Where I agree with the gardening student in Victoria’s story is that perfection can’t be ordered. What I don’t accept is that it can be achieved by artifice at all. Nothing is perfect, nothing symmetrical, but almost everything is beautiful.

  2. This has a hint of the prodigal about it…beautifully written. The perfection lies in the imperfection. It is all perfect just the way it is. There is another idea of ‘perfection’ which in my opinion cripples life.

    1. I’m afraid I don’t get the philosophy of beauty as the Japanese seem to see it, the ordering of nature to improve upon it or give it another mystical meaning. It’s human to want to control, perhaps, but it isn’t a quality I find particularly admirable.

  3. THIS LINE:
    “Yet the beauty of this world is in your lop-sided grin, the way you sing off key, and that you came back one day, after years of anguish, dark skies dispersed and doubts put to rest. ” LOVE this line! That lop-sided grin most especially.
    I think there is a story here, held within.
    Love the haiku at the end as well.

  4. It’s very effective when you bring in a new perspective with “No pitch is perfect to the ears of a dog.” And the haiku at the end captures the theme of the prose section in a fresh way.

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