Dark falls so fast

Not quite a sonnet for Frank Hubany’s dverse challenge. I’m fond of iambic pentametre.

 

Dark falls so fast, the year spins to a close,

Clouds rush across the darkening sunset sky,

The leaves are turning, falling is the rose,

Our hours dwindling with the sun’s last sigh.

No twilight lingers where the fox and hare

Dance with the swirling of the pearly mist,

Cold teeth are baring in the evening air,

And autumn’s cheek grows cold with winter kissed.

Would that the balmy wind, so full of joy

At summer’s brink, when all the world was green,

Blow still among these tired boughs that ploy

Beneath the north wind’s bite, bitter and keen.

Yet if this autumn’s gold was never shed,

Would spring from winter’s blood ever be bled?

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Published by

Jane Dougherty

I used to do lots of things I didn't much enjoy. Now I am officially a writer. It's what I always wanted to be.

33 thoughts on “Dark falls so fast”

  1. /the fox and hare dance with the swirling of the pearly mist/ really hooked me. Your rhyme schemes vary and work well; a terrific tribute to seasonal changes. Nice use of the prompt.

  2. Lovely verses to read Jane. I specially admire the seasonal evolutions:

    Yet if this autumn’s gold was never shed,
    Would spring from winter’s blood ever be bled?

  3. a wistful look if the warmth of the season past would return to us. you write the most touching lines Jane, I feel the essence of the season and how the year really has just spun by fro reading this

  4. Me too, Jane! I love iambic pentameter and your sonnet’ is sublime. Although the darkness of winter can be terribly oppressive, that falling into it, the year spinning to a close, is wonderful. I especially enjoyed the lines:
    ‘No twilight lingers where the fox and hare
    Dance with the swirling of the pearly mist’
    and
    Would that the balmy wind, so full of joy
    At summer’s brink, when all the world was green,
    Blow still among these tired boughs that ploy
    Beneath the north wind’s bite, bitter and keen’.
    Shakespeare’s influence shimmers in your words, Jane.

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