The dark falls quickly

A pantoum for the dverse prompt. This one turned out rather ghostly.

 

The dark falls quickly at this time of year,

When winter clings beneath the leafless trees,

Where in the twilight flit like ghosts the deer,

And dead leaves rustle in the spring-sharp breeze.

 

When winter clings beneath the leafless trees,

I listen for the sound of cracking ice

And dead leaves’ rustle. In the spring-sharp breeze

I think I hear a sound, still imprecise—

 

I listen for the sound of cracking ice.

Though nothing stirs yet in the night-clear air,

I think I hear the sound still imprecise

Of laughter, our voices free of care.

 

Though nothing stirs yet in the night-clear air,

I feel your presence wrapping me in waves

Of laughter, our voices free of care.

A sea of grief rolls now, and fields of graves

 

I feel your presence, wrapping me in waves

Of twilight, where like ghosts they flit, the deer,

And grief, a sea rolls over fields of graves.

The dark falls quickly at this time of year.

Published by

Jane Dougherty

I used to do lots of things I didn't much enjoy. Now I am officially a writer. It's what I always wanted to be.

61 thoughts on “The dark falls quickly”

      1. Wow! i had never have thought that you would have said such a thing…

        i was thinking of try myself, now having no thought about trying…

        🔰

      1. I didn’t know she was your sister. You’ll have to insist that she gets some help. Her situation reminds me of my mother in law and how her husband started to take over with attention seeking (and a sort of dementia) after she got ill.

      2. He is on medication but it is not very effective, all I can do is keep asking her to have it reviewed regularly. My other sister and I ring her regularly and we visit when we can. But it’s about three hours away, and we need to sort the dog and somewhere to stay so it can’t be done at the drop of a hat. 💜

      3. It sounds as though he’s getting demanding, like my father-in-law did. His wife was too ill to be running around after him, but he seemed not to notice. She should take him in and get another medical check done.

      4. Tess is getting some help but he flatly refuses to go to day care so apart from the carers that do a couple of hours here and there so she can go out she gets no break.

      5. That’s what my father in law used to do. Said it was up to his wife to look after him. He only ever went into care while she was in the hospital.

      1. I don’t suppose it will end. All it needs is one man with a mission and there are dozens dead. In Norway it was 77. They’ll always find a reason to have their moment of glory. I hope they don’t decide this one is too sick in the head to lock up for life. And then some.

      2. And do we have a moral duty to try (without any scientific certitude that what we’re doing will make the slightest difference) to rehabilitate someone who has murdered, and revelled in murdering, unknown adults and children? Aren’t there other more urgent priorities for that cash? At the end of the day, the best you can hope for is a hundred families in mourning and one arsehole back in society.

  1. As you know, I love ghostly and, for me, this pantoum is a tour de force! You’ve captured shadows and sound in the opening stanza, with winter clinging beneath leafless trees and dead leaves rustling, which sets up the rest of the poem beautifully, Jane. The gentle shift from the present tense of ‘the dark falls quickly’ to ‘when winter clings…’ takes the reader further into sounds, memories, the sea of grief and fields of graves and back to the present. Wonderful!

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