Winter exit

For the dverse prompt. I plead guilty to this kind of stuff, repeat offender.

 

Days of drifting drizzle and winged wind, flying in the

face of trees bent from decades of bracing themselves,

 

follow in procession, dragging their grey rags. The

spring ritual, introit and dismissal, bird-beat rhythmed

 

into repeated notes de dit de dit de dit echoes against

low hung sky, punctuated with spikes and spires of

 

treetops, the plainchant pure as rain-washed sky,

drawn by skeins of geese to the rim of tomorrow .

 

Published by

Jane Dougherty

I used to do lots of things I didn't much enjoy. Now I am officially a writer. It's what I always wanted to be.

36 thoughts on “Winter exit”

  1. drawn by skeins of geese to the rim of tomorrow . – what a stunning image this is. Drifting drizzle and winged wind, you give not just a beat but life to words.

  2. Winter exit is something I’ve been longing for and am happy to see in the honeysuckle buds, shoots and other signs in the garden. I really enjoyed this poem, Jane! I am another repeat offender of using poetic devices such as these – but then, that’s why they’re called poetic devices! You do it so well.
    Apart from the wonderful sounds in your poem, I love the imagery, especially the opening lines, which are so familiar from the hunchbacked trees I see every day in the North Norfolk landscape. I love the phrase ‘bird-beat rhythmed’ and recognised the familiar sound of the great tit – I personally think ‘de dit de dit’ is its own name, an announcement that it’s here, ready for the spring ritual. My favourite lines:
    ‘low hung sky, punctuated with spikes and spires of

    treetops, the plainchant pure as rain-washed sky,
    drawn by skeins of geese to the rim of tomorrow’
    so beautiful.

    1. Thank you, Kim! I’m pleased you enjoyed it, and recognised the Great Tit. I associate its morse code song with the start of spring. The thrush uses a similar intro too (I can hear them this minute, and the mournful tweet of the chaffinches). The dawn chorus has begun here, the honeysuckle bush has almost finished flowering already, and when the sun is out is full of bees. I’ve never know so much flowering so early. I hope we’re not in for a nasty surprise in February.

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