#writephoto: Dark pool

A short story for Sue Vincent’s weekly photo prompt. You’ll have to go to Sue’s blog to see the prompt as WP refuses to upload it here.

The river flows as it always did, in turbulent pools where the bank is broken by the deep stone walls. Impregnable, they always said, with the cliff behind and the river before, and my father laughed at the notion of siege.
“We have stores enough for two years within and the wells never run dry.”
When he said I was to marry the neighbouring seigneur to make our joint lands the wealthiest in the county, the fort became a prison. You vowed you would come for me, as I vowed I would be here when you did. No walls would keep me in if your arms waited on the other side.
So I was here where the river rolls, with its whirlpool of autumn leaves carried round and round in the current, trapped between buttress and bank, when you guided your boat with muffled oars silently beneath walls. I was here when you raised your sweet face and opened your arms.
You were there, below, when I climbed the parapet, a cord about my waist and tested the strength of the knot about the merlon. And I saw your face, smiling, one last brief moment before my father’s archers leapt from the tower and your smile turned to a grimace of pain and despair.
Only I am here now, watching the river. My father believes women have no courage and doesn’t even think to put a watch on me. The FitzHugh is coming tomorrow to finger the goods, the prelude to my sentence, but by then, I will be where you fell, among the autumn leaves carried round and round in the cold, clear river water beneath this wall.

Published by

Jane Dougherty

I used to do lots of things I didn't much enjoy. Now I am officially a writer. It's what I always wanted to be.

25 thoughts on “#writephoto: Dark pool”

  1. May I add something else to your discussion, Sue and Jane?
    Daughters cost money, a so-called “marriage estate.” This is still represented here in the region as in the Middle Ages. But this seems to be a Christian tradition. Because in the Arab world, people are paid to marry ones daughter. 😉

    1. There are different traditions. Yes, in Christian tradition the woman takes wealth into the marriage and gives it to the husband, as in the Islamic tradition. In some cultures, what she takes in is hers to dispose of as she wishes, and if she leaves, she takes it with her (Old Irish).I think the Vikings had a similar system.

      1. i was in the action real fast, keep up the words, amen, in these times, you are blessed to have artistic talent, while those without, falter inside,amen

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