Sunday Strange microfiction challenge

Ivan Bilibin was a Russian illustrator, especially of folk tales, whose work is beautiful. Russian folk tales can be pretty odd. This must have been one of them. When you work out what’s going on, write me a story, please.

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Sunday Strange microfiction challenge

Sorry to be late posting. I got carried away with gardening. It’s that time of year when if you miss a couple of weekends the jungle has returned and it’s too late to prune it back.

This painting is by Pierre Puvis de Chavannes and I haven’t got a clue what’s going on in it. I look forward to reading any suggestions.

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Microfiction challenge: Looking for pebbles

I did sort of half-promise Michael (of Morpeth Road) that I’d post another oddity to inspire some more weird and wonderful stories. This one, by Frederick Leighton isn’t as exotic as last week’s giant rodent, but it’s a painting that I find lovely in its strangeness. See what you think. Can you get a story out of this painting entitled Greek girls picking up pebbles?

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Microfiction challenge #27: Rescue

Another illustration from Virginia Frances Sterret this week. It’s another old French fairy tale (are there new ones?) but don’t let your imagination be limited by the idea of the fairy tale. The story can be anything at all, whatever the image suggests. My eye is drawn to the window behind. Is it stained glass, looking into a cathedral? And the draperies on the left have a distinctly Japanese look to them. Then there are the questions of: who is the girl, is she protecting the deer or is it the other way round, and what’s with the inscrutable cat?  See what you come up with and post the link to your short (whatever) story in the comments before next Thursday. Sod the Christmas shopping; just have fun 🙂

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Microfiction challenge #26: A journey

Back to one of my favourite illustrators for this week’s challenge—John Bauer. It carries on the fairy/folk tale theme that opens up so many possibilities for letting out our inner child. Who are the children on the white horse? Who is leading them and why? Are they searching for something or escaping? Tell me a story to fit John Bauer’s magical illustration and post the link in the comments before next Thursday. As I mentioned before, internet access is a bit iffy at the moment so expect glitches.

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Microfiction #ThreeLineTales: Box

This is for Sonya’s three line photo prompt

Photo ©Grant McCurdy via Unsplash

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The alien observer picked up the strange box-like object that sat alone on the edge of the melted asphalt, steaming in the crazy winds that blew from the unchained ocean, wondering if it could be some primitive explosive device, but a quick reading revealed complete inertia, so she shook it.

Peering through the glass window, she saw bright images of smiling faces and leaping playful animals that chased and danced as laughter and happiness poured into her hands.

Recognizing them as memories, she replaced them reverently in the little box and cast it adrift on the last tide of the dead world.